Co2 Flow And How To Maximize Your Co2 Cannon Output Explained - CryoFX

 

Improving Co2 Flow and Co2 Cannon Output

Hey guys! Welcome to CryoFX. So this video I'm going to be explaining Co2 flow. Because we explain this a lot on the phone, I want to make sure we just capture this in one video. We can refer people to this video. Thank you for watching/reading!

What I'm going to tell you in this video is how to make your Co2 the most abundant when it's coming out of whatever apparatus you want it to come out of. A jet, a Co2 jet, a Co2 cannon, a handheld cannon. Some of the questions we get asked is, I have one tank hooked up, and it's spraying out.

But it's not looking like your videos. Well the reason being the majority of our videos that we have and we control and the operations that we do, we try to put three tanks onto one output, or three tanks onto one Co2 cannon output, would be a handheld Co2 cannon, a Co2 jet, or whatever apparatus controls the restriction of that Co2 on and off, is basically what a handheld gun or a Co2 jet does.

Why Three Tanks Is Put Unto One Output

Why do I say three tanks? Because in simple layman's terms, you have the Co2 fitting that comes off of the Co2 tank, the diameter, and area space of that hole, three of those equal the size of the hole of our general output high output valve.

What does that mean? That means that when you have one tank, the Co2 that's coming out, remember a Co2 system is the most restrictive flow of the whole system, think of water in a sense. What happens is the most restrictive part, is the bottleneck to the entire Co2 flow.

One Tank on a Co2 System

When you have one tank on a Co2 system, with our products at least, what happens is you have a Co2 fitting, a co2 tank, you have your hose, and you have your handheld gun or your co2 jet. Out of either one of those, the co2 fitting is the most restrictive part of that entire system. Let's say our high output valve, it's probably it's 1500, probably it's a 15 mm valve. Well, what happens is 15 mm, 5, 10, 15, that's only about five. It's about 4 to 5 mm of space and the area of that Co2 fitting.

Well, what does that mean?

That means that one tank is the most restricted part. If I add two tanks to the line, you're going to get more co2 bulk, but you're also going to get more Co2 flow. Because you have more, you have double what you would because of those restrictive fittings. But it still doesn't equal the output that's allowed by the valve because the valve is 15 mm. And again I'm using space, this gets involved in the entire area of the circle or the output that it's coming out of.

But in layman's terms for this video, just want to tell you that. So I can add up to three tanks on the line before now. Before the valve is the most restrictive part. What does that mean? That means that one tank to your hose because the hose is 3’8 and the hose is bigger than both the valve and the fitting. You could probably put five or six tanks, sometimes seven or eight, depending on the size of the hose to equal the total volume that could go through the hose.

Adding More Tanks to Improve Co2 Flow

Well, now the hose is going to be the most restrictive part. If I keep adding more tanks to it, that's not the case here. The most restrictive part you want is the valve because the valve is where you're putting the Co2 out into the open atmosphere.

On our videos, we have such an abundance of Co2 because we have three tanks, sometimes four on that single co2 jet, or cannon system, and what that does is, that allows the most Co2 to flow into the hose. Three tanks flow into one hose. That hose goes to our valve, and that valve puts out into the atmosphere and it looks crazy. Of course, results may vary because of humidity and temperature just wants to preface that.

Variations That Occur With Using One, Two, Three, or More Tanks for Co2 Flow

But in simple terms again and recapping all of this, one tank you're going to get an okay effect. Two tanks; you're going to get more Co2 flow, but you're going to get a better effect, more of a plume, more of a better look. Three tanks; yet even better, it's going to be even better coming out. Again, heat and humidity play a part in this.

But, four tanks, five tanks, six tanks, or more doesn't do any effect on the output. This is because you've reached a point where the valve now is the most restrictive part. The valve itself now is restricting the entire system. So it doesn't matter how many tanks you put on. So, I want to explain this in this video because we do get questions asked about co2 flow.

What You Should Go For

So if you ask us for a recommendation and professional recommendation about Co2 flow, I always say three tanks on the one line with our valves, and our co2 products. Other companies are not going to be the same. That's a whole other video on this page. We have other videos that explain what the difference is between CryoFX products and other companies’ products. More so, it's the orifice of the valve.

Whatever the most restrictive point of that system is, that's going to be your limiting factor ultimately. In other companies, the jets may look cool, they may act cool, and they may do functions like RDM and stuff like that, but guess what? The thing is the most restricted part is, that valve that you don't see, it’s inside that jet and ultimately that's restricting the Co2 flow of everything in that system. So you're going to get less output, not as an abundance of output, and ultimately not going to work as well. So just want to explain in this video.

Wrapping Up on Co2 Flow

Thank you for watching! This was kind of a higher level of intricacy. If I lost you, please visit some of our other videos. You can also look online here, because we do a good job. I was going to say a good job. We do a good job of explaining all of this stuff in detail so you can understand this better and make an informed decision on not only what company you want to go with, but more importantly how to set up your Co2 products. I'm Chris. This is CryoFX. Thanks for watching!